Dilated cardiomyopathy of unknown origin

This forum is intended for international users to help them with the treatment of cardiomyopathy or heart failure.
christine1
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Lid geworden op: Ma Okt 12, 2009 1:14 pm

Berichtdoor christine1 » Ma Dec 13, 2010 4:25 am

Hi Corrij,

How are you? I hope that you are doing well.

During the last months, nothing important happened with my dilated cardiomyopathy. I feel well. In a few weeks, I have to make some exams. I’ll tell you how are my EF.

Nevertheless in September, a blood test showed that the levels of AST, ALT and GGTP were higher than the normal. The problem is that these levels are increased every month. Until September, I reduced all of the vitamins and supplements, but now my gastroenterologist recommends me to stop all of them. He thinks that maybe I have taken too much vitamins and supplements. Some tests showed that I haven’t had hepatitis. I don’t drink alcohol, and I am not an obese person. I am very worried about that because I don’t know what to do. What is more important, my heart or my liver?

Corrij, do you think that some vitamins or supplements of the protocol have side effects that affects the liver?

If I stop the protocol for one or two months, what should happen with my heart?

Thank you again for your assistance.

Best regards.
Christine.

Corrij (therapeut)
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Berichtdoor Corrij (therapeut) » Ma Dec 13, 2010 11:30 am

Hello Cristine,

CoQ10 is not the only answer to the complex issues of heart disease, neurological diseases, or immune dysfunction; however, research indicates that it’s a bigger piece of the puzzle than physicians and scientists ever imagines. The more we study this naturally occurring compound, the more benefits we find. Coenzyme Q10 doesn't cause side effects for most people, The safety of both forms has been tested, and no significant side effects reported. Occasional mild stomach upset may occur. Taking your CoQ10 or ubiquinol with meals usually alleviates this rare effect.

Taking normal levels of carnitine does not lead you to experience unpleasant side effects. However, you may be able to experience having too much energy when taking them, and if you take them later during the day, you might have difficulties falling asleep. These side effects are not really reason for concern in many people, as they are mostly mild to moderate, and easy to deal with.

Adding extra taurine to one's diet may increase physical endurance and reaction times, enhance concentration and alertness, improve memory, strengthen the heart muscle, reduce blood pressure, assist in hydration during exercise and prevent cataracts.
Effects
Studies have shown no significant negative side effects in taurine dosages up to 6 grams a day.

The liver is responsible for filtering the body's blood, metabolizing any drug that is ingested. Some medications can be toxic to the liver, causing inflammation, jaundice and cirrhosis, a chronic disease where the liver develops excess scar tissue.

Some heart medication can cause liver problems for example Amiodarone is a medication used to treat serious heart conditions such as ventricular tachycardia and atrial fibrillation. This drug can cause a range of problems, from mild liver enzyme irregularities, to irreversible cyrrosis


Many drugs have the ability to cause any form of liver disease, including acute and chronic hepatitis as well as a fatty liver and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). And, many drugs can cause cirrhosis, liver failure, or even liver tumors.

Drug-induced liver injury may be diagnosed through blood work. Some medications may cause hepatocellular liver injury. This is manifested by elevations in the transaminases AST and ALT. Other medications may cause cholestatic liver injury. This is manifested by elevations in AP and GGTP. And some medications may cause both types of liver injury. In addition, there are medications that may cause elevated bilirubin levels.

More than 1,000 drugs are potentially hepatotoxic.

I realy don`t believe that your supplements do raise the level of asat and alat.
If your stop taking the supplements your heartcondition can become worse. I have seen this on the dutch forum,

greetings,
Corrij
Those who do not have enough time for good health,
will not have good health for enough time.

christine1
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Lid geworden op: Ma Okt 12, 2009 1:14 pm

Berichtdoor christine1 » Ma Mar 21, 2011 7:03 am

Hello Corrij,

How are you?

Like you recommended me last December, I didn’t stop to take my vitamins and my supplements and I am feeling good. For the high levels of AST, ALT and GGTP in my blood, I decided to change my doctor, because the gastroenterologist, who attended me, is a very traditional doctor. My new gastroenterologist is more an open mind person. After a lot of medical exams (included an Abdominal TAC), he told me that my liver, etc are well. Starting on February 16th, I increased the doses levels of the vitamins and supplements like before September 2010.

I take now:
1) L-CARNITINE: 1500mg (daily)
2) CO ENZYME Q10: 200mg (daily)
3) TAURINE: 1500mg (daily)
4) Vitaminas C: 3000mg (daily)
5) FISH Oil: 2000mg (daily)
6) MSM: 1000mg (daily)
7) Vitaminas D3: 2000 IU (daily)
8 ) Vitaminas B / Complejo B-100: 100mg (daily)

I always take:
1) RAMIPRIL (TRITACE / ALTACE): 2.5 mg (daily)
2) ALDACTONE (SPIRONOLACTONE): 25mg (3 x a week)
3) DIGOXIN: 0.25mg (3 x a week)
4) ASPIRIN: 81mg (3 x a week)

Do you think that I need to add something more (Vitamin E, Alpha-lipioc acid,…)?

Thank you so much for your support.

Take care,
Christine. :D

Corrij (therapeut)
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Berichtdoor Corrij (therapeut) » Ma Mar 21, 2011 6:23 pm

Hello Cristine,

I am glad to hear your feeling good :D
You could add D-Ribose, 10 gram a day.
D-ribose is the new kid on the heart supplement block. As a building block of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), it rapidly restores depleted energy in sick hearts.

You probably haven’t heard about D-ribose. But you will. It’s that good. Every cell in the human body makes some of this simple sugar molecule, but only slowly and to varying degrees, depending on the tissue. The liver, adrenal glands, and fat tissue produce the most—enough to serve their purpose of making compounds involved in the production of hormones and fatty acids. But tissue elsewhere has little.

Red meat, particularly veal, contains the highest dietary concentration of D-ribose, but not significant enough to provide any meaningful nutritional support, especially to unwell individuals. Heart, skeletal muscle, brain, and nerve tissue can only make enough D-ribose to manage their day-to-day needs when their cells are not stressed. Unfortunately, these cells lack the metabolic machinery to make D-ribose quickly when they come under metabolic stress such as blood and oxygen deprivation (ischemia). When oxygen or blood flow deficits are chronic, as in heart disease, tissues can never make enough D-ribose. Cellular energy levels become depleted.

Ischemia may cause the heart to lose up to 50% of its ATP pool. Even if blood flow and oxygen are restored to normal levels, it may take up to 10 days for an otherwise healthy animal heart to rebuild cellular energy and normalize diastolic cardiac function. In studies, when oxygen-starved animals receive D-ribose, energy recovery and diastolic function return to normal in an average of two days. When patients with CAD (coronary artery disease) are treated with D-ribose, symptoms and treadmill time improve significantly within one week.

Several factors determine who should take D-ribose supplements and when they should be taken. Age is one consideration. We believe 20-25% of people over 45, men and women alike, show early signs of diastolic cardiac dysfunction (stiff heart) and are at risk of contracting heart failure later in life. This is especially true in people with high blood pressure, people taking statin drugs, and in women with severe mitral valve prolapse. For these people, D-ribose supplementation increases the cardiac energy reserve and helps the heart restore normal diastolic cardiac function.

We also know that the health of our mitochondria suffers as we age. As a result, even minor metabolic stress can have a dramatic effect on cellular energy stores in an aging population.

Patients with heart disease on drugs intended to increase the contractile strength of their heart are also good candidates for D-ribose. These drugs, known as inotropic agents, make the heart beat harder. This places considerable strain on the heart’s ability to supply enough energy to support the extra metabolic stress. Long-term treatment with these agents drains the energy reserve, essentially running the heart out of energy. Patients with heart failure, chronic coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathy should take D-ribose to offset the energy-draining effects of inotropic drugs such as digoxin. Research shows that supplementation reduces the energy drain without any negative impact on the activity of the drug.

Patients with coronary artery disease and persistent symptoms remain in a chronic state of energy depletion, constantly fatigued, weak, and with their heart function progressively worsening. These patients will almost certainly advance into congestive heart failure without improvement of the energy state of their heart. Restoration of their energy pool can only be accomplished through the pathway of energy metabolism regulated by the availability of D-ribose.

We cannot overstate the effect of D-ribose supplementation on maintaining energy levels. Any tissue that relies heavily on aerobic energy metabolism, such as the heart and muscles, will be severely affected by any amount of oxygen deprivation. The problem is ATP drain. The solution is to give it back!

By the way, I am doing fine, thanks for asking :D

greetings,
Corrij
Those who do not have enough time for good health,

will not have good health for enough time.

christine1
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Lid geworden op: Ma Okt 12, 2009 1:14 pm

Berichtdoor christine1 » Di Mar 22, 2011 4:44 pm

Dear Corrij,

Thanks for your answer. I will look for D-ribose. When I have to take it, after o before meal?

I have also another question. I am 53 years old, and I have never taken hormones. I know a lot of women that take hormones. What do you think about that, and what about vitamin E?

Thanks again for your time.:D

Regards,
Christine

Corrij (therapeut)
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Berichtdoor Corrij (therapeut) » Di Mar 22, 2011 9:35 pm

Hello Cristine

You can take the ribose whenever you want.
Why do you consider to take hormones?

greetings,
Corrij
Those who do not have enough time for good health,

will not have good health for enough time.

christine1
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Berichten: 19
Lid geworden op: Ma Okt 12, 2009 1:14 pm

Berichtdoor christine1 » Vr Mar 25, 2011 8:28 am

Hi Corrij,

I don’t consider taking hormones. It was only a question. I think I’m going to take some vitamin E but not now.

Have a good weekend!

Christine

Kushtrim
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Berichten: 1
Lid geworden op: Di Feb 21, 2012 3:39 pm

Re: Dilated cardiomyopathy of unknown origin

Berichtdoor Kushtrim » Do Feb 23, 2012 5:41 pm

Dear Corrij
Good day to you. The following were what my father took as supplements for a period of 3 months 4 years abo

MSM
Chromium
Taurine
Carnitine
Q10
and some other....

He's been feeling okay. Would you suggest another similar treatment as it is now 4 years he has not taken the supplements

Regards,
Kushtrim


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