treatment andrea

This forum is intended for international users to help them with the treatment of cardiomyopathy or heart failure.
andreaQ
Bekende op het forum
Berichten: 22
Lid geworden op: do okt 04, 2007 10:14 am

Bericht door andreaQ » ma nov 05, 2007 5:33 am

Hello Corrij,

I'm wondering where to start with the heart failure protocol, and I don't really want to go ahead without knowing what's the best way to begin. I'm up to 3000mg of the MSM and taking carnitine and chromium, with magnesium and flaxseed for omega 3s.

I've been able to find a supplier of Solgar supplements in New Zealand, but may have difficulty obtaining them in the recommended doses etc - I may have to look further afield, but that's OK of course! Can you advise me about what supplements I should now add?

Also, I've been reading other people's stories and have been puzzled by the differences in ejection fractions. Mine, and my daughter's, are both 'normal', but we were both very unwell when we were diagnosed, and both needed a defribrillator. I suspect the difference may be due to arrythmias in my case (my daughter has no arrythmias when she uses CPAP for her sleep apnoea). Is it possible to feel really unwell because of the enlarged heart and arrythmias, even when the ejection fraction is within normal range?? Some people say they didn't know they were ill until they were diagnosed - yet my daughter and I both felt every bit of our heart problems! Very strange how everyone is so different!

Looking forward to beginning the actual protocol now - thankyou again Corrij.

PS - my daughter is a bit worried about the treatment, but she can see that I'm improving (just from the changes Ive made recently) and is becoming more interested - I really hope she will eventually join me on this path too!




      Stay happy - warm regards.

      Corrij (therapeut)
      Verslaafd aan het forum
      Berichten: 3948
      Lid geworden op: do mei 19, 2005 10:46 pm
      Contacteer:

      Bericht door Corrij (therapeut) » ma nov 05, 2007 10:20 pm

      Hi Andrea,

      Youre now taking,

      Carnitine
      MSM
      Chromium
      Magnesium
      Flaxseed

      You can add the following supplements,

      Taurine 3 x 500 mg a day
      Vitamin C 3 x 1000 mg a day
      Vitamin E 1 x 400IE a day
      Q 10 2 x 100 mg a day

      Yes it is posible to feel unwell with your symptons, that unwell feeling can also be caused by the meds your taking.
      Every person reacts different.

      greetings,
      Corrij

      If your daughter have some questions, don`t hesitate :wink:
      Those who do not have enough time for good health,
      will not have good health for enough time.

      andreaQ
      Bekende op het forum
      Berichten: 22
      Lid geworden op: do okt 04, 2007 10:14 am

      Bericht door andreaQ » wo nov 07, 2007 4:15 am

      Thanks Corrij,

      I've ordered the new supplements and will begin as soon as they arrive - much appreciated.

      I'm in the same situation as Verona, in that my daughter doesn't have a computer either. However, she comes to see me at my office from time to time and uses the computer there - I may ask her to look at the forum next time she comes in (Monday next week). We are waiting to see what happens after the surgical treatment of her sleep apnoea - she has no symptoms when she uses the CPAP machine, but may still need it after surgery. Our aim is to improve her quality of life by making her less dependent on the CPAP (and ICD) - for a young adult, it's a lot to deal with! Even though the sleep apnoea is a major problem, I believe she can benefit from having the right nutritional support too (her diet is not great).

      I also think it's important for her to talk to you herself, but I can only encourage her to do so, as she's very independent - perhaps next Monday!

      Thankyou again Corrij - you seem to be supporting whole families on the forum now!! :wink:
      Stay happy - warm regards.

      Corrij (therapeut)
      Verslaafd aan het forum
      Berichten: 3948
      Lid geworden op: do mei 19, 2005 10:46 pm
      Contacteer:

      Bericht door Corrij (therapeut) » wo nov 07, 2007 11:33 am

      Hello Andrea,

      I Know it isn`t easy for a youg adult to deal with all of this, and it would be great if she didn`t need the CPAP anymore, but its great it exist.

      Obstructive and central sleep apnea are common in heart failure, and may participate in its progression by exposing the heart to intermittent hypoxia, increased preload and afterload, sympathetic activation, and vascular endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of sleep apnea in patients with heart failure may reverse these detrimental effects, in addition to alleviating symptoms of sleep apnea. In patients with heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea, short-term randomized trials have demonstrated that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves cardiac function, and lowers sympathetic activity and blood pressure. However, there are no data on whether treating obstructive sleep apnea in patients with heart failure improves morbidity and mortality. Various treatments have been tested in heart failure patients with central sleep apnea, particularly oxygen and CPAP. Both reduce the frequency of central respiratory events, and lower sympathetic activity. In addition, CPAP improves cardiac function. However, the largest randomized trial did not demonstrate any beneficial effect of CPAP on the rate of mortality and cardiac transplantation (32 vs. 32 events in the control and treatment groups, respectively; p=0.54), but ultimately lacked power to conclude with certainty whether CPAP has an effect on morbidity and mortality in such patients. Thus, although there are data to indicate that treating both obstructive and central sleep apnea in patients with heart failure improves cardiovascular function, larger randomized trials involving interventions such as oxygen, CPAP, or other forms of positive airway pressure will be required to determine whether treating these sleep-related breathing disorders reduces clinically important outcomes such as morbidity and mortality.


      We conducted an evidence-based review of literature regarding use of oral appliances (OAs) in the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) from 1995 until the present. Our structured search revealed 141 articles for systematic scrutiny, of which 87 were suitable for inclusion in the evidence base, including 15 Level I to II randomized controlled trials and 5 of these trials with placebo-controlled treatment. The efficacy of OAs was established for controlling OSA in some but not all patients with success (defined as no more than 10 apneas or hypopneas per hour of sleep) achieved in an average of 52% of treated patients. Effects on sleepiness and quality of life were also demonstrated, but improvements in other neurocognitive outcomes were not consistent. The mechanism of OA therapy is related to opening of the upper airway as demonstrated by imaging and physiologic monitoring. Treatment adherence is variable with patients reporting using the appliance a median of 77% of nights at 1 year. Minor adverse effects were frequent whereas major adverse effects were uncommon. Minor tooth movement and small changes in the occlusion developed in some patients after prolonged use, but the long-term dental significance of this is uncertain. In comparison to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), OAs are less efficacious in reducing the apnea hypopnea index (AHI), but OAs appear to be used more (at least by self report), and in many studies were preferred over CPAP when the treatments were compared. OAs have also been compared favorably to surgical modification of the upper airway (uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, UPPP). Comparisons between OAs of different designs have produced variable findings. The literature of OA therapy for OSA now provides better evidence for the efficacy of this treatment modality and considerable guidance regarding the frequency of adverse effects and the indications for use in comparison to CPAP and UPPP.

      PMID: 16494093 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

      Department of Otolaryngology, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita, Japan. itasaka@med.akita-u.ac.jp

      The effectiveness of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty was evaluated in 28 patients (25 men and three women; mean age 47.6 years) with obstructive sleep apnea by comparing preoperative daytime polysomnography with those carried out 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. The mean apnea plus hypopnea index (AHI) in the supine position decreased from 51.0/h to 23.0/h 6 months postoperatively and 57.1% of patients showed a 50% or more reduction of AHI. By changing the sleep position from supine to lateral, 71.4% of the 28 patients indicated a 50% or more reduction in AHI before surgery, which increased to 92.3% of 26 patients 6 months postoperatively. The positive results of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty were maintained at least until 1 year after surgery.

      PMID: 11422867 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

      greetings,
      Corrij
      Those who do not have enough time for good health,
      will not have good health for enough time.

      andreaQ
      Bekende op het forum
      Berichten: 22
      Lid geworden op: do okt 04, 2007 10:14 am

      Bericht door andreaQ » ma nov 12, 2007 8:37 am

      Hello Corrij,
      My name is Karla and I am Andrea's daughter. I have heard a lot about this forum from my mother and she seems very impressed and interested in some of the information she's accessed regarding cardiomyopathy using this site and from yourself personally. Mum said you have been asking how I have been going with my own cardiomyopathy and sleep apnoea battle. I cannot think of anything I would like to ask you right now as I believe mum has already made thorough investigations regarding our medical complications. I am seeing a ENT specialist next week to discuss wether having my tonsils removed might improve my sleep apnoea and thus improve my heart condition sysmptoms. My sleep study showed that I had 34 apnoea episodes per hour which was considered by the doctors as severe and came as quite the surprise to the both of us. Mum believes that my undiagnosed sleep apnoea could have contributed to the early onset of my heart condition. I personally don't know what to think, as I believe I have had this all of my life. The first thing I remeber as a child (about 7years) is the what sounded like a person walking on pepples outside my house when I slept (my ears to the pillow), which is the same thing I hear when I have a distended heart beat now. Sounds silly perhaps, but I think it was the sound of my heart-murmur. In my teen years I noticed I felt like passing-out as though I had asthma immediately after I competed in swimming races. I've had small palpitations since about age 13 which became increasingly worse. My teen years saw a quick deterioration into the full blown symptoms of Cardiomyopathy. Luckily I was diagnosed at age 20 because I don't think I would have survived much longer otherwise. I am extremely sceptical about having great gains in my health and quality of life these days, but mum has faith in the sleep apnoea surgery. I suppose if I had any real questions it would be in regards to dealing with low blood pressure and chronic lethargy? I have been so good on my Atenolol, but sometimes wonder if there was a way I could get off them and whether my ICD surgery really was neccessary. Anyway, my mum is keeping me up-to-date with the information she finds regarding Cardiomyopathy and sleep apnoea. I am interested in stem-cell research and advances with Cardiomyopathy perhaps in conjuction with natural therapies (especially dietary). Have you perhaps got any ideas on the effects of promethazine and cardiomyopathy.
      Laatst gewijzigd door andreaQ op ma nov 26, 2007 7:41 am, 1 keer totaal gewijzigd.
      Stay happy - warm regards.

      Corrij (therapeut)
      Verslaafd aan het forum
      Berichten: 3948
      Lid geworden op: do mei 19, 2005 10:46 pm
      Contacteer:

      Bericht door Corrij (therapeut) » ma nov 12, 2007 5:06 pm

      Hello Karla,

      Thank you for telling me your story.
      Do you have a obstruction in the upper airway?


      This is the only thing I could found about promethazine and cardiovascular risks.


      Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville.

      Promethazine is an antihistamine commonly used for sedation in clinical pediatric medicine. We studied the cardiovascular effects of promethazine in normoxic, conscious, chronically instrumented neonatal lambs. Eight lambs received 1.3 mg/kg of promethazine intravenously (i.v.) while at rest. In all lambs, promethazine led to elevations of pulmonary vascular resistance, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, mean transpulmonary pressure, mean left atrial pressure, and the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic vascular resistance. In addition, five (63%) of the lambs demonstrated an increase in mean systemic arterial pressure and systemic vascular resistance to promethazine. A subgroup of three lambs, which tended to be younger, failed to demonstrate the systemic vascular response to promethazine. Promethazine given i.v. has important cardiovascular effects. We hypothesize that promethazine used for sedation before cardiac catheterization in children may alter subsequent hemodynamic observations.

      PMID: 3186535 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

      About your sleep apnoea, I agree with your mum, Obstructive and central sleep apnea are common in heart failure, and may participate in its progression by exposing the heart to intermittent hypoxia, increased preload and afterload, sympathetic activation, and vascular endothelial dysfunction.

      Atenolol is a beta blocker,

      Problems with beta blockers
      On the downside, studies suggest an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people who take beta blockers. Also, people who already have diabetes should use caution taking beta blockers with other high blood pressure medications. This is because beta blockers may mask the symptoms of hyopglycemia (low blood sugar), which can be dangerous.
      Because beta blockers can narrow bronchial airways, patients with asthma, emphysema, and chronic bronchitis should avoid beta blockers if possible. Some beta blockers tend to lower HDL cholesterol (the "good" cholesterol).
      In general, the benefits of beta blocker therapy usually outweigh the side effects.
      Side effects
      Possible side effects include:
      • Fatigue and lethargy
      • Sexual dysfunction/erectile dysfunction
      • Insomnia
      • Vivid dreams and nightmares
      • Depression
      • Memory loss
      • Confusion -- especially in the elderly
      • Dizziness and light-headedness upon standing
      • Lessened capacity for exercise
      • Cold hands, fingers, feet, toes
      • Decreased heart function
      • Stomach and digestive problems -- diarrhea or constipation
      • Asthma, emphysema, and bronchitis can be aggravated

      Promethazine may cause breathing to slow or stop, and may cause death in children.
      Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

      wheezing
      slowed breathing
      breathing stops for a short time

      Did you know this?

      regards,
      Corrij
      Those who do not have enough time for good health,
      will not have good health for enough time.

      shane
      Verslaafd aan het forum
      Berichten: 109
      Lid geworden op: zo okt 14, 2007 1:30 pm
      Locatie: Northwestern USA

      Bericht door shane » za nov 17, 2007 8:23 pm

      Hello Andrea,

      It is very stressful to find out about heart failure especially if your own son or daughter has the condition also. It seems like our lives center around worrying. :cry: But many prayers and finding this forum has been a great comfort to my son Shane, and I.

      I'm sure that soon our quality of life will be much better, and am looking forward to a much better future with our lives and health improving with each day.

      Corrij and her knowledge is such an encouragement and great hope for all of us!

      Take good care,
      Verona

      andreaQ
      Bekende op het forum
      Berichten: 22
      Lid geworden op: do okt 04, 2007 10:14 am

      Bericht door andreaQ » zo dec 23, 2007 2:32 pm

      Hello Corrij and everyone on the forum,

      Happy Christmas! And thanks especially to Corrij for her wonderful work and support - it means so much! I hope 2008 brings health improvements for everyone, which will offer hope for the future. :D
      Stay happy - warm regards.

      Corrij (therapeut)
      Verslaafd aan het forum
      Berichten: 3948
      Lid geworden op: do mei 19, 2005 10:46 pm
      Contacteer:

      Bericht door Corrij (therapeut) » zo dec 23, 2007 3:05 pm

      Hi Andrea,

      Thank you very much<a href="http://plugin.smileycentral.com/http%253A%252F%252Fwww.smileycentral.com%252F%253Fpartner%253DZSzeb008%255FZN%2526i%253D36%252F36%255F15%255F61%2526feat%253Dprof/page.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/36/36_15_61.gif" alt="SmileyCentral.com" border="0"><img border="0" src="http://plugin.smileycentral.com/http%253A%252F%252Fimgfarm%252Ecom%252Fimages%252Fnocache%252Ftr%252Ffw%252Fsmiley%252Fsocial%252Egif%253Fi%253D36%252F36_15_61/image.gif"></a>

      I wish you a merry cristmas and a very healthy new year

      <a href="http://plugin.smileycentral.com/http%253A%252F%252Fwww.smileycentral.com%252F%253Fpartner%253DZSzeb008%255FZN%2526i%253D8%252F8%255F6%255F41%2526feat%253Dprof/page.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/8/8_6_41.gif" alt="SmileyCentral.com" border="0"><img border="0" src="http://plugin.smileycentral.com/http%253A%252F%252Fimgfarm%252Ecom%252Fimages%252Fnocache%252Ftr%252Ffw%252Fsmiley%252Fsocial%252Egif%253Fi%253D8%252F8_6_41/image.gif"></a>

      greetings,
      Corrij
      Those who do not have enough time for good health,
      will not have good health for enough time.

      Corrij (therapeut)
      Verslaafd aan het forum
      Berichten: 3948
      Lid geworden op: do mei 19, 2005 10:46 pm
      Contacteer:

      Bericht door Corrij (therapeut) » ma jan 28, 2008 9:50 pm

      Hi Andrea,

      I am wondering how things are?
      Hope youre doing well,

      greetings,
      Corrij
      Those who do not have enough time for good health,
      will not have good health for enough time.

      andreaQ
      Bekende op het forum
      Berichten: 22
      Lid geworden op: do okt 04, 2007 10:14 am

      Bericht door andreaQ » di mar 04, 2008 8:28 am

      Hello Corrij,

      I've looked in to the forum a couple of times, but have been too busy to read everything thoroughly or to post a reply. Thanks so much for checking on me though Corrij - your attentiveness to everybody is a great support, and I have really appreciated your knowledge and willing assistance. It really is amazing :P

      Things became very complicated for me. I'm feeling well most of the time, except for problems with arrhythmias that can be very disabling at times. The main problem for me is that I'm allergic to some of the supplements, and it's taken time to work out how I can manage the protocol with the allergies. When I first started on the protocol, I would feel really well for a while, and then I would start to feel unwell again. Then I'd start another part of the protocol and the same thing would happen. I'm now back on the full protocol except for the MSM.

      I had gotten so ill that I could eat very few foods, which is a big problem for basic nutrition. And worse, I had significant arrhythmias every time I ate something that I was allergic/intolerant to - there were so many of them! I've lived with allergies and chemical sensitivities for as long as I can remember - it's also why I was having problems with my blood pressure medication last year. I deteriorated significantly when I was on it, until I worked out what was causing the problems. However, once I stopped taking it I felt so much better, but it left me with far worse food intolerance and chemical sensitivities than I'd had before.

      I'm now working with a new treatment that is a little 'fringe' or 'experimental', although there is some science behind it based on acupressure and acupuncture. It's been my only hope apart from strict avoidance, which is my usual strategy, and avoidance doesn't help if I need medications - it was no longer a solution anyway, because of the number of things I had to avoid. My allergy specialist is a harsh critic of the treatment, because it's not mainstream - as he has to be. However, I have more episodes of anaphylaxis during his treatments than when I manage it alone, and he cannot treat me for most of the food intolerance and chemical sensitivities. So I stopped having the desensitation injections in 1997. I've been undergoing the new treatment for a couple of months now - and was very, VERY sceptical when I started - but I'm amazed at the improvement. I can now have basic things like toast and milk coffee (decaf, of course!) for breakfast if I want to, or oatmeal - things than most other people take for granted. I have a long way to go, as each treatment is specific to the allergen. But it also means that I'll be able to take heart medication again soon, as they can treat me for my allergy to beta blockers. I'm trained in the sciences, so it's been quite confronting to my sensibilities on a number of levels, but it works - all my symptoms are reducing and some have disappeared.

      A related problem has been that I can't have an ICD because the leads into the ventricle have a coating made from a petrochemically based substance. This needs to be sorted out some way, and I'm hoping the allergy treatments will allow an ICD at some time. The hospital is pressuring me to have one, because it looks bad for their statistics if I keep postponing - not a very supportive approach! So...it's all very complicated!!

      I realise this all sounds pretty strange and difficult, and for a while I was quite worried. However, I've now subscribed to private health insurance and will start working with a new cardiologist in a few weeks. I need someone who is willing to help manage my cardiomyopathy with the allergies, rather than pressure me to have treatment (ICD) that may end up damaging my heart or killing me anyway! I'm also going to start treatment for my sleep apnoea, as this seems to be making things worse too (although I'm not nearly as bad with it as my daughter is).

      Oh dear - when I read this back, I sound like a sad sick old lady (well, not so old!). In fact, I'm feeling better and better and taking more control of my health...but it's a long and winding path! And that's why I've been a bit quiet on the forum - I wanted to see how things were going - and it's still a bit early at this stage. Rest assured that I am still taking my CoQ10 and amino acids, as well as the vitamins - I've been treated for the amino acids allergy, and have to be careful about the purity of the vitamins I take. Apart from that, it's all systems go :P And I keep reading more and more of the research...

      PS - Karla was interested for a while, but is not so sure now. She seems to be happy managing with the CPAP and ICD, and is actually quite well. I suspect, however, that her allergies will worsen later, as mine did - but hopefully not! If she sees me getting better, she's more likely to take notice - but that hasn't been the case lately and she's been very worried about me. I'll keep you posted about her though, in case she changes her mind.

      Warm regards to you Corrij - I hope you and your family are keeping well and happy!
      Stay happy - warm regards.

      Corrij (therapeut)
      Verslaafd aan het forum
      Berichten: 3948
      Lid geworden op: do mei 19, 2005 10:46 pm
      Contacteer:

      Bericht door Corrij (therapeut) » di mar 04, 2008 4:54 pm

      Hello Andrea,

      Food Allergies: Enhancing Natural Bacteria
      The symptoms seen with food allergies are often the same as allergic symptoms not related to foods. Other conditions are sometimes also associated with food allergies, such as migraine, chronic ear infections, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease (Gaby A 1998). About 2 percent of adults in the United States have food allergies (Moneret-Vautrin DA et al 2005). Food allergies are sometimes associated with anaphylaxis, and can also cause low-grade gastrointestinal upset.
      The health of the gastrointestinal system plays a pivotal role in food allergies. The gastrointestinal system acts as a semipermeable barrier, allowing only usable molecules into the bloodstream after food has been broken down. However, when the intestinal wall has been weakened by infection or inflammation (possibly caused by allergic reactions), the barrier function is compromised, allowing large molecules to pass through the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream (Moneret-Vautrin DA et al 2005). Allergic sensitization can occur as the immune system responds to these abnormally large molecules, causing digestive complaints such as upset stomach or diarrhea, or symptoms such as joint pain and headaches (Moneret-Vautrin DA et al 2005).
      To avoid these kinds of allergic reactions, researchers have examined ways to reduce permeability in the intestinal wall. One promising method is to enhance the population of beneficial bacteria in the gut with probiotic bacteria. The human digestive tract relies in part on colonies of healthy bacteria to aid digestion. There is evidence that a healthy population of intestinal bacteria can help reduce intestinal permeability (Vinderola CG et al 2004; Gun F et al 2005).
      Probiotic bacteria include Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria, and Saccharomyces boulardii (Casas IA et al 2000; Pelto L et al 1998; Goldin BR 1998; Cross ML et al 2001). Also, fructooligosaccharides should be included to encourage the growth of beneficial bacteria (Bouhnik Y et al 1999). Freeze-dried beneficial bacteria and fructooligosaccharides are sold as dietary supplements.
      What Makes an Allergy Attack
      In most allergy cases, the body is first sensitized to a foreign protein (allergen), causing the production of an antibody called immunoglobulin E (IgE). The newly produced IgE antibody circulates in the bloodstream, where it attaches to another kind of white blood cell called a basophil. In addition, IgE binds to mast cells, a type of white blood cell located in the skin and the mucosal lining.
      The next time the allergen is recognized, the IgE antibody provokes the release of chemicals that cause a typical allergy attack. These chemicals include histamine, prostaglandins, and leukotrienes. Histamine in particular is an important target for allergy medications. Produced by mast cells, histamine causes localized swelling and inflammation. Many conventional treatments block the action of histamine. Certain nutrients have been shown to depress the activity of mast cells.
      Besides the release of histamine, activated mast cells cause inflammation in other ways. During the inflammatory response to an allergen, pro-inflammatory chemicals are released from mast cells. In response to the pro-inflammatory chemicals, leukocytes (white blood cells) are attracted. The result of this cascade is inflamed tissue and increased production of white blood cells—a runny nose and increased mucus secretion in the lungs.
      A connection with leaky gut syndrome?

      Leaky gut syndrome is a term used to explain the malfunctioning of the gut when particles such as poorly digested food, bacteria, and toxins are allowed to leak through the gut wall into the lymphatics and subsequently the bloodstream.When this occurs, the immune system produces a response wich causes a reaction against the food and other materials.A resulting inflammatory response can lead to conditions such as allergies, asthma, immune disorders, Crohn`s disease, colitis, and irritable bowel syndrome.There can be sufficient inflammatation in the gut to hamper digestion.There appear to be multiple contributory factors involved in the leaky gur syndrome.They include,
      Food sources such as sugar, refined flour, processed food with preservatives and low fiber content, and caffeinated beverages.
      Alcohol and prescription drugs such as antibiotics.
      Nonprescription drugs such as asperin and non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen.
      Mercury(such as in dental fillings)

      If you have food allergies, a leaky gut could be a large part of the problem and taking steps to correct it could be the beginning of better health.
      Improving a diet by avoiding caffeine, alcohol, refined carbohydrates, and sugar could be a good start.
      Maintain a balanced diet, emphasizing fresh fruits and vegetables.Shop on the periphery of the supermarket where perishable foods requiring refrigeration are sold.Eat foods on a 3-days rotation basis.That is, allow at least 3 days between eating any particular food.Remember, some foods such as wheat and corn, as well as soy and milk protein, tend to appear in many forms, particularly in processed food.Diligence is required to recognize and avoid all of these.

      greetings,
      Corrij
      Those who do not have enough time for good health,
      will not have good health for enough time.

      andreaQ
      Bekende op het forum
      Berichten: 22
      Lid geworden op: do okt 04, 2007 10:14 am

      Bericht door andreaQ » vr apr 11, 2008 8:06 am

      Hi Corrij,

      Hasn't been much activity on the forum lately, but I still check in regularly to see how everyone is going. :D

      Thanks for the info about allergies - like many people in my situation I've read heaps about it and I've learned to manage it better and better over time. It's a nightmare trying to work it all out though! For example, when I learned I was allergic to casein, the protein in milk, I switched to soy milk, only to discover that I was also allergic to soy and the sunflower oil that's in most soy milk products!!! And so it goes... although, I have to say, my allergies are pretty good these days (I think it's mostly because my diet has improved with old age - ha!).

      A question about the protocol... I've been on the protocol now for 6 months, and I'm still plagued by arrhythmias, mostly PVCs as far as I can tell. But sometime I worry that they may become more than that. On those occasions, I've taken more magnesium than Willy recommends, but I'm concerned that I may be doing more harm than good (e.g., up to 600mg). I'm wondering what is a safe dose when they get bad?

      I also start on CPAP tonight, which I hope will bring my blood pressure down and improve my symptoms - the arrhythmias are always worse when my BP is up, but the systolic pressure is very unstable - sometimes good, but often elevated too. However, none of the doctors I've seen will prescribe any medication because of my allergies, so I guess I'm stuck with it - will keep on trying to find someone who can help though.

      Anyway - nice to chat as always :wink: Hope you're well and happy, and that your husband is also keeping well - warm regards.

      PS - Karla is still doing OK and plans to go back to university this year
      Stay happy - warm regards.

      Corrij (therapeut)
      Verslaafd aan het forum
      Berichten: 3948
      Lid geworden op: do mei 19, 2005 10:46 pm
      Contacteer:

      Bericht door Corrij (therapeut) » za apr 12, 2008 3:19 pm

      Hi Andrea,

      About the magnesium,600 mg is a safe dose.

      Magnesium is needed for hundreds of your body's basic functions, including regulating your heart and blood pressure and helping to metabolize sugar and fats. It also helps your nervous system and combats such problems as insomnia and anxiety.

      Step 1:
      Take the chelated form of magnesium, such as magnesium citrate, glycinate or malate. This form is absorbed best by your body.

      Step 2:
      Combine magnesium with calcium. The easiest way is to take a balanced formula of one part magnesium to two parts calcium.

      Step 3:
      Take vitamin C at the same time. It helps make magnesium more biologically available to your body.

      Step 4:
      Bathe in magnesium sulfate, better known as Epsom salts. The mineral can be absorbed through your skin.

      Step 5:
      Reduce or eliminate your consumption of soft drinks. Their high level of phosphates causes magnesium to be depleted from your body.

      Step 6:
      Lower your fat intake. A high fat intake will also cause magnesium to be depleted from your body.

      Step 7:
      Watch your intake of vitamin D. High doses will cause magnesium to be leached from your body.

      Step 8:
      Decrease or eliminate alcohol use. It can lead to magnesium loss.

      Step 9:
      Check your prescription drugs. Diuretics, digitalis, tetracycline and corticoids are some of the medications that can lead to magnesium loss.

      Step 10:
      Watch your intake of foods high in oxalic acid. These include almonds, chard, cocoa, rhubarb and spinach. They can cause reduced magnesium absorption.

      Step 11:
      Decrease or eliminate your intake of animal proteins. High amounts can lead to reduced magnesium absorption.

      Ask your Doctor for this test,
      The Best Test To Determine Your Level of Magnesium

      Although most physicians rarely check this important mineral, the few that do usually rely on test called Serum Magnesium. Unfortunately, this test only measures approximately 1% of the magnesium in your body.. a poor test at best. The "Gold Standard" and the most accurate test is the RBC Minerals or more commonly called Elemental Analysis in Packed Erythrocytes. This test examines the levels of eight minerals and seven toxic heavy metals. The erythrocyte is the red blood cell that floats in our serum to carry oxygen to our cells. The minerals this test analyzes from inside the red blood cell includes magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, selenium, vanadium and zinc. Another test which has proven to be extremely valuable in detecting magnesium deficiencies is called the Urine Magnesium Loading Test. In this test, the patient collects a 24-hour urine sample and the total magnesium is measured. The patient is then given a dose Magnesium Chloride 18% and another 24-hour urine specimen is collected. The magnesium is again measured. If the body retains more than a certain amount of magnesium, then it is concluded that the body is magnesium deficient.

      greetings,
      Corrij
      Those who do not have enough time for good health,
      will not have good health for enough time.

      andreaQ
      Bekende op het forum
      Berichten: 22
      Lid geworden op: do okt 04, 2007 10:14 am

      Bericht door andreaQ » ma apr 14, 2008 5:06 am

      Hello Corrij,

      Thanks once again for your useful information - I was especially interested in the information about the heavy metals test, and I feel a lot safer and happier knowing that I'm not doing any harm with the magnesium dosage. The cardiologists I've seen will not medicate me because of my allergy history and reactions to beta blockers, so some days the only thing that got me through was magnesium. I worried about taking so much, but was faced with the prospect of having to give up work if I couldn't find a solution.
      I've been on CPAP now for 4 days, and there's been a significant reduction in my arrhythmias - e.g., I haven't had any today at all and hardly any yesterday!!! Usually they occur during/after exercise and after eating anything that I may be sensitive to, although the allergy treatments are making it much easier to track down problem foods, and it's becoming less of an issue. In between episodes, I actually feel normal for longer and longer periods. The allergy clinic is going to treat me for my sensitivity to beta blockers too, so I'm hopeful that life can become more normal over time. I actually feel 'normal' for longer and longer periods now - and I'm sure this is mostly due to the protocol, as I've improved slowly but surely over the last few months, despite having other complications to deal with. But I know it's still early days.
      Thanks once again for all that you do Corrij - so important to those of us on the forum - stay well and happy.
      Stay happy - warm regards.

      Plaats reactie